The Reason Sushi Chefs Choose Norwegian Salmon

And, get some sushi-making tips from the experts.
1 of 2

Do you know that seafood could be the answer to future food security if managed responsibly?

Yes, the oceans can provide over six times more food than it does today, a new report shows. The report was presented at a UN conference about sustainable fisheries in Rome recently and is the first in a series of 16 blue papers from the High Level Panel for a sustainable ocean economy.

The High Level Panel is led by Norwegian Prime Minister (PM) Erna Solberg and consists of 14 leaders from ocean nations across the world, such as Canadian PM Justin Trudeau, Japanese PM Shinzo Abe and Portuguese PM Antonio Costa.

Read: Can Junk Food Make You Depressed?

The main conclusion from the report is that if wild fisheries and aquaculture is managed in a sustainable way, the oceans could provide over six times more food than it does today. This represents more than two thirds of the world’s future protein needs, and with a much lower carbon footprint than many other foods. Sustainable marine aquaculture – or mariculture – is highlighted as the area with the most potential for growth.

Asbjorn, is giving the guests a full explanation on how Norwegian salmons are grown and farmed.

Asbjorn Warvil Rortveit, Norwegian Seafood Council’s regional director for Southeast Asia

Norwegian salmon is grown and farmed under stringent conditions to ensure the fish is environmentally friendly, safe for consumption, and of high quality.

“The Council runs the Global Sushi Academy in collaboration with World Sushi Skills Institute, the only recognised sushi body in Japan. The training under renowned sushi master Hirotoshi Ogawa, aims at educating sushi chefs on the traditional art of sushi-making and more importantly, the hygienic handling of raw seafood for consumption,” says Asbjorn Warvil Rortveit, Norwegian Seafood Council’s regional director for Southeast Asia.

Read: SLOW-COOKED NORWEGIAN SALMON WITH CHILI BEAN TOMATO SAUCE

Two award-winning Malaysian chefs have rained at the Global Sushi Academy run by the Council. Chef Leon Yap Wee Leong won the World Sushi Cup 2019 in Tokyo in August, while Chef Sky Tai Koon Siang was World Cup Sushi Cup champion for 2018.

1 of 2