Is Sparkling Water Actually Bad For Your Bones?

It has zero calories, but does cause any damages to your bones?
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Most people are swapping soda for sparkling water, also known as soda water, in an effort to quench their thirst for bubbles without the negative side effects for their health. While sparkling water is missing some of the obviously unhealthy qualities of soda (like sky-high sugar content)—is it really void of all the risks?

More specifically, if some soda has been linked to poor bone health, does that mean seltzer could be bad for your bones, too? We asked dietitians to set the record straight.

What is sparkling water exactly?

“Sparkling water is carbonated water, which is water infused with carbon dioxide and sometimes flavor (generally natural flavor),” says Melissa Majumdar, R.D.N., registered dietitian nutritionist and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. It is naturally sugar-free and calorie-free, making it a fab option for those trying to kick a soda habit. And, if you’ve heard the rumors that seltzer dehydrates you, that’s wrong:

“Since unflavoured sparkling water is simply regular water with added carbon dioxide, it’s just as hydrating as plain water,” confirms Cordialis Msora Kasago, R.D.N., registered dietitian nutritionist and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “However, due to its effervescent nature, some people tend to fill up quickly when they drink it and therefore drink less water than when they drink simple plain water.” So if bubbly is your only source of water, be sure to drink up.

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