HOW TO EVALUATE HEALTH INFO ON THE INTERNET

Stay informed with these tips.

If a video or article about new health benefits and guidelines sound too good to be true, it probably is—and nutritionists, including Cooking Light’s nutrition director, Brierley Horton, MS, RD, are finding that certain mediums are more likely to be misleading than others.

Read: HOW TO MAKE HEALTHY FOOD CHOICES AT THE ECONOMY RICE SHOP

So, in an era where a fake social media post can become viral overnight, how can you avoid falling victim to inaccurate nutritional advice?

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Look at the byline

It all starts by taking a peek at the source’s byline or credit, says  Horton. “Who is posting or writing the content? What kind of credentials do they say they have? Ideally you want someone who is a registered dietitian (RD) or registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN).” She explains that these professionals have passed a national board exam in addition to earning degrees, and in some cases, have a master’s degree or a certification in a specialised area of nutrition (like dietetics or weight management). 

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